2013 Wynn Newhouse Awards Exhibition

The Palitz Gallery, NYC

Syracuse University Lubin House

April 14 – May 22, 2014

 

This year’s exhibition of the recipients of the Wynn Newhouse Awards will feature the work of 5 artists:

Ken Grimes

Christpher Knowles

Jason Lazarus

Carmen Papalia

Kendrick “Rusty” Shackleford

 

2013 SELECTION COMMITTEE

Alexander Bacon, PhD
Critic, Brooklyn Rail

Suzanne Kreps
Manager, OK Harris Gallery

Sarah Suzuki
MoMA Associate Curator

Laura Swanson
Artist, 2012 Newhouse Awards recipient

 

ABOUT THE WYNN NEWHOUSE AWARDS

In 2006 the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation established the Wynn Newhouse Awards providing grants to artists of excellence who happen to have disabilities. The Foundation currently allocates $60,000 per year for these awards, distributed among winners at the discretion of the invited judges on the selection committee. The judges chosen to be on the selection committee are individuals who are respected in the arts and disabilities communities. To be eligible for nomination, candidates must be fine artists of professional standing with a disability, as recognized by the Americans with Disabilities Act. Candidates must also have a dedicated website showing examples of their work. The sponsors of these awards believe that this program will draw attention to the achievements of artists with disabilities, and show that these artists often have unique skills and insights which can benefit us all.

 

WYNN NEWHOUSE (1954–2010)

As a young man, Wynn Newhouse lost functional use of one hand in an industrial accident. He was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in midlife. As he became increasingly constrained by MS he learned about the negative perceptions that many persons have about people with disabilities. He set out to correct these false public impressions, and began several programs to nurture outstanding talents.

Wynn knew that talented people having disabilities are exceptional contributors in many fields. He partnered with para-Olympic athletes to build elegant and competitive hi-tech sports equipment for top disabled athletes. He joined the Board of the Disability Law Center in Boston to help his constituents obtain the equal opportunities they deserve.

Wynn learned that many disabled youths are often excluded from after school programs for legal or social reasons, or because providers are poorly trained in inclusion skills. He initiated a project that enabled young people with disabilities to participate in over 50 arts, recreational, learning and sports programs. Hundreds of promising disabled kids in Boston were the beneficiaries.

Wynn built guitars and loved ‘60s and’70s rock music. He also was an avid art collector. In 2005, he conceived of the Wynn Newhouse Awards, a program to give grants to talented fine artists having disabilities. Wynn was joined by top artists, curators, and critics who shared his belief that many “disabled” people have unique insights and skills that can enhance their ability to create exciting art.