The Study Cabinets

 

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Located in the Collection Galleries, The Study Cabinet is an exhibition tool intended for all visitors to the SUArt Galleries to explore the deep holdings of the University’s Permanent Collection.  Based on a 19th century design, these cases can hold up to 80 objects and provide visitors with an in-depth look at particular themes, subjects, and media.

Currently on view in the Study Cabinets:

January 18 – May 13, 2018

Abraham Hankins, City Nights, 1950.

AMERICAN WOODBLOCK PRINTS

This exhibition displays the work of more than 20 artists who made woodblock relief prints an important aspect of their artistic output and allows the viewer to see how different artists utilized the media throughout the century to create landscapes, urban scenes, figurative images, and expressionist pictures. Beginning with the wood engravers, Henry Wolf and Timothy Cole, who are more closely linked with the 19th century use of the media, and continuing into the next century with the innovative use of woodworking tools by Louis Schanker and Leonard Baskin, these images show the versatility of relief prints.  Experimental printmakers, throughout the century, pushed these media in new directions and recently artists have combined the relief print with other media to create exciting images It is also important to note that many women artists not only worked in these media but had a profound impact on their use and popularity. It is also important to note that many women artists, such as Anne Ryan and Clare Romano, worked in these media and had a profound impact on their use and popularity.

 

January 18 – May 13, 2018 

Philippe Halsman, O’Connor, Donald, 1952

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION: Philippe Halsman’s Hollywood

Philippe Halsman moved to Paris in his 20s. Magazines including Vogue, Voila, and Vu began to give him regular work and his exhibitions gained critical attention. In 1940, with the help of Albert Einstien, he emigrated to New York City.

After two years of struggle, Halsman photographed his first cover for Life magazine. He would go on to photograph and record a record 101 covers for the magazine. This exhibition features a selection of portrait photographs of the brightest stars of the Post-War era, from Bob Hope to Bing Crosby to Carol Channing and Lucille Ball. In every case, Halsman was able to capture an emotion or reaction from his sitter that offers a deeper insight into the star’s true personality.

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